5 Surefire Ways To Optimize Your Book’s Sell Sheet

Introduction

In order to become, or remain, financially successful as a self-publisher, you must be able to quickly and effectively get your marketing message to your book-buying audience. Your book’s sell sheet is an excellent tool to do this. It’s a perfect marketing tool for offline AND online marketing – because it’s simple to understand, and gets directly to the point.

And, as The Professor likes to say, it’s “no fuss, no muss, no waste, no bother,” for you or the buyer. (He has a many insightful gems like that. I hear them all the time. He has one for every imaginable situation. But, he’s a very wealthy business genius, so we all listen.)

Here Are The 5 Essential Elements To Optimizing Your Sell Sheet:

Optimization Tip # 1: Keep It Simple

The genius of a sell sheet is that it’s quick and easy to read. It’s supposed to convey the most important and pertinent information about your book in a short, simple, and obvious, format. And, it must be appealing to look at and read while doing all of that. All of the information on the sell sheet must only be concerned with your book. No extraneous information necessary. In other words, don’t oversell or exaggerate.

Ask yourself: “What information is absolutely necessary that will help the buyer make the decision to find out more about my book, or go directly to buying it?” Get to it quickly. You only have about 30 seconds to hold onto the person reading your sell sheet. Use every inch of it very wisely.

Optimization Tip # 2: Differentiate Your Book

You’ve all heard about differentiation a million times before. Differentiate yourself, your message, and your book, from your competition. You know this already. If you didn’t already know how to differentiate yourself, your message, and your book, from your competition, BEFORE you wrote your book, you have much bigger problems that a sell sheet can’t fix.

Your message that you want, or need, to share with your reading audience, and how you write about it, needs to come through on your book’s sell sheet. Look at yourself, your message, and your book, from the perspective of your audience, your readers, your customers. Now show them how you and your book are different, or better, or more insightful, for your book’s subject matter, than your competition is.

Optimization Tip # 3: Build Visual Hierarchy

By “visual hierarchy,” I mean that the reader’s eyes should first be drawn to the most important item on you sell sheet. This item, or text, or photo, will probably be the biggest item on the page. This might be the book’s cover, for example. Or the title of the book near the top. You should get the idea here.

Then their eyes should be drawn to the second most important item on your sell sheet. Maybe this is a word or statement about the book’s subject matter. The text here might be bigger or more colorful than the other text on the page. Then on to the third most important information that you want the reader the see next. And so on.

Typically, these items start at or near the top of the page, which is where most people first look it. And when viewing on a computer screen, almost always from the top down. Your goal is to help the reader navigate your sell sheet in a pleasant, visually appealing, and easy to read format.

Optimization Tip # 4: Back Up Your Claims

The person reading your it will decide if you’re qualified to write this book, and help them with their problems, in a matter of seconds. Again, look at yourself, your book, and your sell sheet, from the perspective of the reader.

And then ask yourself several questions: “Is this person believable? Does this person look and sound like he can help me with my problems? Help me improve my life? Help me find the answers I need?” Does he have believable qualifications that prove he can write about this book’s topic?”

Remember, every word and picture on that sheet can help or hurt your credibility. It’s up to you to convey your claims about your book, and about you, to the reader in such a way that’s believable. Too much embellishment, or boasting, and you will lose them – in a matter of seconds – and they won’t come back.

Optimization Tip # 5: Make The Call-To-Action (CTA) Easy

By “easy,” I mean KEEP IT SIMPLE. Provide several uncomplicated ways for the reader to contact you and get more information about you and your book. This can be your telephone number at your office. It can be an email address directly to you. The absolute minimum that you must have is a link to your book’s website or landing page. It can also be a link to the book’s Amazon page.

If your book is available for sale to book stores, libraries, and universities, you should mention that your book is available through book distributors Ingram, and Baker and Taylor, for example. Keep in mind how your book’s demographic, or readers, buyers, customers, and clients, will most likely want to contact you.

Conclusion

Don’t be afraid to have more than one sell sheet for your book. You can create one that is more directed toward your clients that visit your office, for example. One for the people that read your blog. And, you can create one for libraries and schools. You wrote the book, so you already know who your audience, or audiences, is for your book.

Your book’s sell sheet can help you give your audience the appropriate message that is most likely to resonate with them to the highest degree, and help them to make the decision to buy your book.

The Big 3 Factors in Choosing a Sports Handicapper

Are you a sports fan who likes to bet on his favorite team? Are you a casual bettor or do you bet on sports seriously? For casual bettors who enjoy plopping down a few bucks on a game of interest, there is not so much a need to pay for a professional service that provides betting advice. It’s just a little money on an interesting game, and it makes spectating a little more enjoyable. But for those individuals who take their sports betting seriously, they may want to consider hiring a sports handicapping service.

In many cases, it can make sense to hire a handicapping service, but you need to understand exactly what you are paying for. You’re not hiring the handicapper (also known as “capper”), for some additional counsel. They shouldn’t be viewed as just another opinion. If you are going to pay handicappers, then you should take their tips and bet them accordingly. Picking and choosing which bets to play may not be the best strategy.

So let us assume you have made the decision to hire a capper because you are serious about making money in the world of sports betting. What should you look for in your search? Although there are many similarities in the various cappers, there are also some differences as well. In this article we will review three of the most important considerations.

Look for an Experienced Handicapper
There is an old saying that there is no substitute for experience and that is very true in the world of sports handicapping. Make no mistake that capping sports games successfully takes a lot of hard work. There are many variables to consider and these guys need time in the business to really figure out how to do their jobs effectively. That usually involves many years in the business. Thus, look for a handicapper with at least ten years of solid experience handicapping sports.

Find a Handicapper Who Posts Results Publicly
In the business of sports betting, there are many handicappers who prefer to keep their identities and results private. That may serve their own needs well, but for me, I want to know who I am hiring and what their track record for successful capping has been. Look for someone who isn’t afraid of being transparent, if not with their identity, at least with their results. It is common knowledge that even the top handicappers are only successful 55-60% of the time. Make sure the handicapper has a success rate of a minimum of 55%, so that you can bet profitably over the long run. After all, you are paying him for his expertise and he should therefore be willing to own up to all of his picks.

Ensure the Pricing Structure Fits into Your Budget
The bottom line in professional sports betting is making money. The bookmaker must get paid. The handicapper must get paid, and you, the bettor, wants to get paid too. Before you hire a handicapper, make sure you have a complete understanding of his prices. Are you paying for a subscription? If so, how long does it last, and is the renewal rate the same? Calculate the handicapper’s fees into your formula to determine how successful you need to be to profitable. Higher priced handicappers are more suited for the bigger bettors.

Conclusion
Who is the best sports handicapper? The answer may surprise you. There are quite a few good ones out there. If you choose one that has been capping for at least ten years, posts their results publicly, and has a fair pricing structure, then you have done your homework and are ready to dive into sports betting with a good partner.

Casino Hold ‘Em: The Poker Table Game Where Players Compete Against the Casino, Not Other Players

Casino Hold ‘em is similar to the king of all poker games, Texas Hold ‘em. The main difference being players compete against the house rather than other players. It is easy to learn and play, as long as you understand poker hand rankings. Novice players need not worry about being intimidated by other players. First let’s list the face value for each card and the five card poker hand rankings in sequential order:

Face Value of Cards

2 through 10 and Jack, Queen, King, Ace (2 is lowest, Ace is highest)

Poker Hand Rankings

High card – Five cards of different values with mixed suits and Ace being the highest.

One Pair – Two of the same cards such as 2, 2.

2 Pair – Two of the same cards twice, 7,7, & K, K

3 of a Kind – Three of the same cards, K, K, K, (AKA Trips)

Straight – Five cards in sequential order with mixed suits, 7,8,9,10, J

Flush – Five cards with the same suit in any order (5 Spades, Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds.

Full House – Trips and a Pair, Q, Q, Q, 8,8, (AKA, Full Boat).

4 of a Kind – Four of the same cards, J, J, J, J, (AKA, Quads).

Straight Flush – Five cards of the same suit in sequential order.

Royal Flush – 10, J, Q, K, A, of the same suit.

How to Play

A standard 52 card deck is used. All players must first make an ante wager before play begins. There is also an optional bonus wager called AA Bonus. The dealer will then deal his or herself two hole cards face down, and place three community cards face up in the center of the table. This is known as the flop. The community cards can be used by all players to complete their hands.

Players examine their cards and must make one of two decisions:

Fold – forfeiting the ante bet.

Call – Make a wager equal to two times the ante bet.

The dealer will then deal two more community cards face up for a total of five, and reveal his or her cards. The players and dealer make their best five card poker hand by using any combination of their own two cards and the five community cards.

The dealer must have a pair of 4′s or better to qualify. If the dealer does not qualify, the call bet pushes and the ante bet will pay according to the pay table listed below.

If the dealer qualifies and player beats dealer, the call bet pays 1 to 1 and the ante bet pays according to the ante pay table below.

If the dealer qualifies and beats the player, the player loses the ante and call bets.

If the dealer qualifies and ties the player, the ante and call bets push.

Pay tables may vary, below is supposedly the most common one:

Ante Bet Pay Table

Royal Flush – 100/1

Straight Flush – 20/1

4 of a Kind – 10/1

Full House – 3/1

Flush – 2/1

All Other – 1/1

Optional AA Side Wager

The AA optional side wager pays if the player is holding a pair of Aces or better. The bet pays even if the player folded the original hand. Here is the pay table:

Royal Flush – 100/1

Straight Flush – 50/1

4 of a Kind – 40/1

Full House – 30/1

Flush – 20/1

Straight – 10/1

Three of a Kind – 8/1

Two Pair – 7/1

Pair of Aces – 7/1

Strategy

Strategy is rather simple for this game according to gaming Analysts. Only the worst 18% of hands should be folded. Which are two low unsuited hole cards with no chance of a straight or flush when matched with the three-card community flop.